Archive for Videos

Tuesday 26/11/91 – 6th Video in Capetown

Monday 25/02/91 – 4th Video – 3rd lesson Cape Town

23 years ago today, Hughan and I were back in Cape Town, and Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre was doing a video recording of me working with Hughan.

Vanessa was correcting me during the session ( Hughan is 2  1/2 years old). These recordings were done during each return visit to the centre, every 3 months. We could then watch them at home in Gaborone, Botswana as a reminder of what we should be doing. I was being taught how to work with Hughan.

DIARY NOTES – In 1991, 23 years ago today this is what Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town wrote in the ‘Diary’.

23 years ago today, Hughan and I were back in Cape Town, and Vanessa was writing in our diary.

I was being taught how to work with Hughan –

Activity : blowing activities

Aim : specific naming, repetition of actions and language, extension of repetitive language.

Good Sue, your waiting for his eye contact before you give him the language.

Lovely pausing and expectation of verbal response for the word “blow”.

What I really love is the way you praise him. It is such motivation for him to try again.

“Ta” – when saying “ta” don’t use your hand straight away. First give him the command without the natural gesture and then if he doesn’t respond, come in with the natural gesture.

When he shakes the empty matchbox, instead of saying “there are no matches” rather interpret on an auditory level – in other words “I can’t hear”.

You said “hot” then Hughan said “ho” (hot) plus he put his hand over the flame and then quickly pulled it away.

You said “blow” (the candle)

Sue you get much wonderful eye contact and attention that you can really pause and expect nicely.

Command: “give mummy the match”. Lovely! When he didn’t respond you resorted to “ta”. Don’t change, keep the same vocabulary, ie. keep reinforcing “give” when he doesn’t understand you rather use the natural gesture (out stretched hand) then saying “ta”.

Hughan said “ie” as in (lie) – nicely interpreted Sue: “light the candle”.

He responded to “way the smoke” twice, this was lovely. Still difficult to determine whether he really understands or is he remembered the sequence we had been repeating with the candle.

Hughan said “ie” for “light”, note the same sound as before when he pointed to the candle and you interpreted light the candle, in other words “light” – fantastic!

Lovely modelling of number: “Mummy has 2 candles”.

Concept of big and small = lovely concept.

Command: “put the matches in the box”. No response and he went on to lighting the match. Once giving a command follow it through so that you reinforce the language.

“ba” (mind) when he want you to leave something alone.

Reacted to his name when I was knocking on the window – localised J

“bo – bo” of when popping the bubbles with his fingers – in other words “pop” which Sue had been modelling.

Sue this was a fantastic session I thoroughly enjoyed it and so did Hughan.

Willem welcome once again to Cape Town. Thanks for all the loving support you give Sue.

Enjoy the visit to the Dominicon Grimley (a school for hearing impaired children in Cape Town) tomorrow.

See you on Wednesday.

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you :) )

Tuesday 04/12/90 – 3rd Video Carel du Toit Centre

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today Hughan and I were attending our fifth lesson with Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town…

 

Activity: instant pudding

Aims:

1)      auditory training

2)      expect one word utterances

3)      receptive language

Good naming: as you held the object right next to your face:

“Spoon”: “this is a spoon”

“bowl”: “this is a bowl”

“sieve”: “hold the sieve”

Good you emphasised “pour” on its own, waiting and expecting a response and then put “pour” into a short sentence. “Pour the milk”. I want to see this a lot more.

WONDERFUL!!! He did respond to them knocking. He looked at the camera (wrong direction that for now that is okay) and kept dead still. My first definite observation of a reaction to sound this visit J

Sue don’t rush! Take your time. Forget about completing the activity, rather concentrate on how you can extend each step e.g. you could have banged a lot longer with the spoon and made much more of the pouring of the milk.

With your commands remember

1)      get his eye contact

2)      give the command (no gestures)

3)      allow him to respond

4)      if he doesn’t understand you, do the command, and repeat the language.

Don’t be too hasty when moving from step 2 to step 3.

e.g. “pour the powder in the milk” – you were already doing the action and helping him to do it before you had completed the command. Ideally try hold the object next to your face ( pudding packet) – say the whole sentence “pour” “pour the powder in the milk” and when finished then only do the action and repeat the language.

Great: you are always waiting for his eye contact before you give him the language. Keep this up.

Hughan said – “G”: give him the language for what he wants to say e.g. “give me the beater please”. Good you do this nicely when he said “Aa” and pointed at you “mummy’s turn”.

Hughan said – “On”(gone) plus arms stretched out; “gone” (the mixture is finished) lovely J.

Note for my command “ta the cloth” (give me the cloth) I had a class in one hand and paper in the other. A wonderful way to check if he understood “cloth”. He took the correct one J. I would try this is a few times to check if he really understands the word. Try similar techniques at home.

On the video we also tried this with the parts of the face: “ta the eye” and you held the eye and the nose in your hand.

Thank you Sue this was a lovely video session, and we got a few of his one word utterances which illustrates the progress (expressive language) he’s made.

Enjoy the beach.

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)

Monday 20/08/90 – 3rd visit to Cape Town – 2nd Video

DIARY NOTES – play dough….In 1990, this video was taken during our third trip to the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town. Vanessa was teaching us and this is what she wrote in our hearing impaired son’s diary…

These notes were taken during the video recording.

Activity: play dough

Aims:

1)      incorporate Vil (Jamie)

2)      name everything

3)      expect language

Lovely eye contact: “pour the flour”.

Vil also gave his language nicely to Hughan. Remember to guide him not to touch Hughan when he wants Hughan’s attention. The most rather bang / clap – make a noise ie. use sound.

Good turn taking: each one had a turn to pour the flour, pour the salt, stir the mixture and roll the dough.

This is super and it’s good for Vil to also wait until it’s his turn (to learn turn taking).

Lovely use of the sentence of touch:

“feel the flour”

“flour is soft” – good labelling Sue.

“Salt – put the spoon in the salt”

“pour the salt” – lovely labelling. You rarely using everything’s name. Keep this up. Also you paused after “salt”, expect language and then put the single word into a full sentence.

Lovely Sue: you’re getting beautiful eye contact before and while you’re giving language input to Hughan.

Nice interaction Sue:

”Mix, Mix – Mix with your hands”.

“Push the dough”.

Hughan imitated you beautifully non-verbally:

pushing the dough with your finger.

Rolling the dough to and fro.

Super: You imitated him banging and took the opportunity to do auditory training. Remember to imitate the sound with your voice after you have made the sound, or else your voice (Bang – bang / Tap – tap) is drowned by the very loud noise your making and don’t forget to point to your ear and say “I can hear”. We are making him aware that we are listening, so in turn heel let us know when he hears something by pointing to his ear.

J Hughan localised my tapping with keys on the dustbin – lovely!

“Give me the star” – nice interpretation of Hughan’s actions and babbling.

Vil said “Look mummy” – give him attention when he wanted to share something with you. It won’t have disrupted the activity or lost Hughan’s attention because Hughan was content playing on his own with the play dough.

Sue thanks round lovely session. Remember the following tips

don’t rush – Sue give attention to both appropriately

do intensive turn taking

model for Vil

encourage Vil to talk to Hughan.

Your rarely labelling beautifully. Note my intonation when I played with Hughan.  Tried to shift your emphasis sometimes to the first word especially if it’s the one you’re emphasising (as opposed to the last word).

“Open – open the tin”.

“Roll – roll the ball”.

Keep this lovely work Sue – Hughan is progressing nicely.

Thanks

Vanessa

Wednesday 30/05/90 – First video

(VIDEO 5th lesson…Cape Town 1990) Helping parents with deaf children through our experience…

Today, Vanessa was filming Hughan and I, so I could take the video home with us to Botswana, as a reminder of what we had been doing in Cape Town.

This is what Vanessa wrote in the diary…..

Activity : condensed milk balls.

Aim : interpretation of his babbling and actions

Lovely Sue you did not gesture. You did the action and gave the language at the same time – “drop the biscuit in the packet”.

Good turn taking – Hughan put a biscuit in, mummy put a biscuit in.

Hughan’s eye contact was a lot better today. Be patient with the eye contact and don’t give up. Remember that if he is interested in watching the action you’re doing – rolling a rolling pin – just pause for a moment (stop the action) and he will 9/10 times look up at you (to query why you have stopped) and then you have your eye contact and quickly give your lovely suitable language input.

Hughan babbled a lot more today – “a –ja”, “wa-wa”, “ba-ba-ba”.

Good interpretation of his actions, “the tortoise wants to eat some coconut”, “mummy I want some more”.

A good strategy to bear in mind is do – talk – do.

First roll the rolling pin, then stop and talk with eye contact – “roll the rolling pin” and then do the action again.

Lovely imitation of Hughan banging the rolling pin and of him rolling the rolling pin.

Good turn taking again – “mummy roll the rolling pin”, “Hughan roll the rolling pin”.

Sue this was a lovely session and we had it on video! Thank you very much. You’ll gesturing has improved hundred percent. You are a lot more aware of the finer details of your technique now. Keep up this lovely work and positive attitude. The sentences you jotted down are good examples of meaningful repetition and naming – varied language input.

See you Friday.

Vanessa