Archive for Cape Town – Carel du Toit

Thursday 01/03/90 – 3rd lesson in Cape Town

We arrived at the Carel du toit Centre for our next lesson with Nessa.

Activity: Bath time

Aim:  1) interpretation of his babbling and actions

2) Turn taking.

Good! You’re giving him the language for his babbling and actions.

“Ta mummy, ta the duck” when he had his hand stretched out and wanted the duck.

Giving this direct language is good and should always be done, rather than say, ask the question –

What is it Hughan? Because he is not going to be able to answer that question.

Lovely turn taking: Hughan stroke mummy’s hand. Stroke Nessa’s hand. Stroke Hughan’s hand. (This is also repetition and he is experiencing his body parts and learning their names).

His non-verbal imitation is lovely. He copied me squishing in the water, throwing the fish in the water, throwing the toys in the basin, patting, the cat on the bath, stroke my arm, touch his toes J.

Remember not to strain your voice.

Sue you are really persevering with the eye contact. You got lovely eye contact when you took the boat and held it next to your face because that was the item he was interested in. Note how he did something (splashed in the water) and then looked up at me smiling and expecting a reaction. I was so happy – he is already learning that we make eye contact when we communicate and he was communicating with me. This is stimulated and encouraged by following his interest and imitating his actions. By doing so he is getting feedback and feeling there is importance to his vocalisation and actions and thus will do them again.

He rarely enjoyed the session and babbled quite a lot. Note how we brought auditory training in –

Woof, woof with the dog, squeaking the kangaroo, clapping, shuffling the toys in the basin etc. Each time you looked excited, pointed to your ear and said “I can hear” plus imitated the sound with your voice. He would laugh in response to your expressions. This is lovely – he is aware that this is fun.

I hope you can stay another week. Thanks for your hard work. See you 8.30am tomorrow.

Nessa

Wednesday 28/02/1990 – 2nd lesson Play dough

We were looking forward to another lesson with Nessa.

Wed: 28/02/1990

Activity: play dough

Aim:

1.       eye contact

2.       Auditory training

3.       Repetition

Play dough recipe

2 cups of flour

1 tablespoon salt

1 tablespoon oil

Dash  of colouring.

Mix together and then gradually add water and tool the dough mixture has a correct texture. Keep in the fridge.

Good Sue your trying to name everything and your correcting your staff immediately if you use “it”.

You’re getting his eye contact. It’s not easy but you are using the correct methods. In other words – you are not touching him, you are clapping, using sound, taking things next to your face J keep this up.

“Give me the spoon”

“pour, pour the flour”

“pour, pour the oil”

That is Lovely repetition. First you used the main word on its own and then in a short full sentence.

Remember to interpret his babbling and actions – “Give me the cup mummy” if he stretches out his hand and wants the cup. Also when doing auditory training copy the sound with your voice ie: Bang! Bang! Knock! Knock! You’re using your face nicely and pointing to your ear. Good!

Thank you Sue and Willem – see you tomorrow.

Nessa

After the lesson we took the boys to the beach in Cape Town.

The First Lesson – 27/02/1990

The Carel du toit Centre – 27/02/1990

When we arrived for our first lesson at the centre, Nessa was there to greet us and we were taken into a room that looked exactly like a sitting room.

On one wall was a big glass mirror. Nessa explained to us that she would be sitting in the room next door, observing Willem, Vil and I while we were playing with Hughan. She would be correcting us while we were playing with him and encouraging us to work with Hughan in such a way, that he would learn his lip reading skills and how to communicate.

“The first lesson” – 27/02/1990

Activity: Tin and blocks and dog

Aim: 1) To teach Hughan to be aware of sound and to react to sound.

2) Eye contact at all times.

Lovely Sue and Willem you both waited for eye contact with all you gave him the language.

He immediately pointed to his ear and his nose and his eyes when discussing the dog’s face. Lovely J.

Sue you used your face nicely and pointed to your ear. Vil did this well too. It’s great that you are  incorporating him. I know it feels silly to point to your ear in the beginning but with time you will not even think about it.

Remember to interpret his actions and babbling -

If he stretches out his hand – say “give me the bowl mummy”.

Name everything – as of now “IT” is no longer in your words.

“Put it in the tin” – rather say “put the blocks in the tin”.

Thank you – I am looking forward to working with you –

Nessa

Top Tips – Working with your hearing impaired child

Welcome to Hughan’s diary Top Tips.

These are the top tips that I was introduced to when we first started the program at the Carel du Toit Centre, in Cape Town, in February 1990.

1) Keep a Diary -

A diary is a fantastic way of writing down the progress your child is making, activities you have done at home concerning your child’s development.

Take photos of the activities you do as well.

The diary should be fun and where you get your inspiration.

By doing this every day or at least once a week it enables you to look back at your diary notes and realise the improvements.

(I am able to look back 23 years to our diary to realise what we did to help our son)

2) Name Everything -

Never use the word – “IT”.

Everything has a name. By naming everything your child will learn the language.

For example –     say “ball….give me the ball”

-          not “give it to me”

A hearing impaired child needs to hear a word many times (I was told 20,000 times) before they will have the inclination to repeat that.

3) Always Face towards the light (window)

Your child must see your face clearly when you talk to them, because they can make use of the extra information to fill in “gaps” – your emotion (sad, happy, excited).

4) Eye contact -

Always make eye contact on eye level.

Kneel down when you talk to your child, or pick him up, or hold them on your lap.

5) Hold objects next to your face -

Hold objects which you are talking about next to your face.

e.g. “ball”, hold a ball next to your face when giving the word.

“This is a ball”, “this is David’s ball”, “catch the ball”, “give me the ball”.

6) Talk about things that interest your child -

Talk about the things he is doing, is looking at, is playing with, is eating.

Talk about his clothes and his body parts when dressing him, also at bedtime.

Talk for him e.g. your child points to a ball (maybe also making some “sounds”).

Ask yourself – what does he want to say? Then say the words for him -

“I want the ball”, “give me the ball”, “here is the ball”.

7) Auditory training –

This is also very important. Your child has residual hearing and we must help to make the most of it.

We must develop his listening skills

a)      we must make him aware of sound and no sound

b)      he must be able to localise sound (where it is coming from)

c)       he must react correctly to sound

d)      he must learn the meaning of sound

e)      we must refine sound

8) speak clearly and in full sentence –

Take one word out of the sentence and repeat it, if you want the child to repeat it. Use that word again in a sentence.

e.g. “cup”, “this is a cup”, “take the cup”.

9) Encourage the child to copy words –

Be happy if he says something even if it is just a sound or part of a word because this will encourage him to try again. Copy what he says because this will teach him what communication is:

e.g. mummy says something…….( I listen)

I say something…….. (mummy listens)

10) Remember – everything has a name –

Give the child the names for things and actions and so the number of words he knows will become more.

e.g. “car”, “this is a car”, “daddy drives a car”.

All babies hear a number of sounds. They become familiar with this sounds.

The sounds which have an important meaning for the child, will be the most easily learnt.

The most important sound is his mother and father’s voice.

On getting used to his mother’s voice (sound), he shows a response.

He discovers his own voice (sound), then later on he tries to imitate the sounds he hears. That is why meaningful talk and repetition is so important.

If his parents imitate his sound, he starts learning the meaning of communication:

e.g. – baby smiled at mummy……. mummy smiled back.

- baby makes babbling sounds…….. mummy imitates them – they are communicating!

REMEMBER :

1) always wear their hearing aids

2) keep the moulds clean

3) check that the batteries

4) when you put their hearing aids on, smile and say “I can hear”! Your face must show him that hearing is fun.

Also “educate” all the members of the family and friends who play with, or talk to your child – this is very important.

This is a team effort and your child will only benefit from it.

“I hope you find these top tips helpful while you are working with your child”.

Remember your child will copy your actions.

Never get angry or frustrated with your hearing impaired child – they will copy you!

By giving your child love and encouragement they can achieve everything you wish…..

I feel blessed to have had their hearing impaired child myself. He has taught us so much.

Hughan’s Diary 23 Years Ago

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This DIARY has enabled me to bring you our story.

Dear parents

Welcome to our program. We hope, and believe, that you can benefit from it in guiding your child. The child is utterly dependent on the adults near him, most of all on his mother and father.

You are welcome to use this book to write down any change in progress, or activities done at home, concerning your child’s development. We will appreciate it if you will do that at least once a week because we do acquire insight in his progress as well as your observation of him. Remember to bring this book every time.

Remember to attend all appointments. If you cannot attend your appointments please contact us as soon as possible and cancel it. This gives us a chance to help another patient during that time.

Please read and reread all the information in this book from time to time!!

A few points to remember while you are working with your child:

1) Always face towards the light (window) : your child must see your face clearly when you talk to him because he can make use of            extra information to fill in “gaps”, for example – emotions (sad, happy, excited).

2) Eye contact: always make eye contact on eyelevel. Kneel down when you talk to your child, or pick him up, or hold him on your lap.

3) Hold objects: which you are talking about next to your face: for example – Ball. This is a ball. It is David’s ball. Catch the ball. Give the ball.

4) Talk about things that interest your child: talk about the things he is doing, is looking at, is playing with, is eating. – Talk about his clothes and his body parts when dressing him also at bath time. – Talk for him, for example, your child points to a ball (maybe also makes “sounds”). Ask yourself: what does he want to say? Then say the words for him: I want the ball. Give me the ball. Give me the ball, mummy. Here is the ball. Thank you.

5) Auditory training: This is also very important. The child has residual hearing and we must help him to make the most of it. We must develop his listening skills.

a)      We must make him aware of sound and no sound.

b)      He must be able to localise sound.

c)       He must react correctly to sound.

d)      He must learn the meaning of sound.

e)      We must refine sound: – environmental sounds, animal sounds and speech sounds.

6) Speak clearly and in a full sentence: Take one word out of the sentence and repeat it, if you want the child to repeat it. Use that word again in a sentence, for example – Cup. This is a cup. Take the cup.

7) Encourage the child to copy words. Be happy if the child says something even if it’s just a sound or part of a word, because this will encourage him to try again. Copy what he says because this will teach him what communication is: mummy says something (I listen) – I say something (mummy listens)

NEVER USE THE WORD “IT” – Remember everything has a name. Give your child the names of things and actions and so the number of words he knows will become more, for example – Car. This is a car. Daddy drives a car.

All babies the number of sounds. They become familiar with the sounds. The sounds which have important meanings for the child, will be the most easily learnt. The most important sound is his mothers and fathers voice. I’m getting used to his mother’s voice (sound) he shows a response. He discovers his own voice (sound), then later tries to imitate the sounds he hears. That is why meaningful talk and repetition is so important. If his parents imitate the sounds, he start learning the meaning of communication:  Baby smiles at mummy – mummy smiles back. Baby makes babbling sounds – mummy imitates them. They are communicating.

REMEMBER:

1)      always wearing the hearing aids

2)      keep the moulds clean

3)      check the batteries

4)      when you put the hearing aids on, smile and say I can hear!” – Your face mass show that hearing is fun.

Also educate all the other members of the family and friends who play with, or talk to your child – this is important, this is a team effort and your child will only benefit from it.

Thank you

Nessa

Hughan’s Diary – Carel du Toit Centre

Hughan’s Diary, an introduction into the journey we have been on with our profoundly deaf son!

23 years ago we were faced with making many decisions, that have been the most incredible roller coaster in our lives.

We have never been content with the first opinion we were given. We were exposed to this very early on, in the initial diagnosis of our son Hughan’s deafness.

I am going to be following the daily diaries we kept, during the time we lived in Botswana 21 years ago and having to travel to Cape Town, to the Centre, that has proved to be the most critical decision of all.

Every little decision we have made as a family, has had a major impact on how Hughan talks, he can now talk on a telephone. I find it still incredible that I can phone him up on his mobile and have a normal conversation with him.

From being diagnosed profoundly deaf with 110 decibel loss of hearing and being told that not even hearing aids would benefit him,

to this, 21 years later…

When I turned 50 I realised that I needed to put pen to paper to document how Hughan has achieved what he has, in case another member of our family has a deaf child.

Then I soon realised that this information may help other parents facing the same decisions as us. So I decided to start writing a book.

Being brought up in Africa and feeling so privileged to have done so, I then decided it was pay me back time. So some of the proceeds from my book will go to raise money for the deaf children in Africa.

Because we were living in Botswana and we had to travel to Cape Town in South Africa, meant that we were living a long way from the Centre we had chosen to work with. I was encouraged to write down each day what Hughan and I had done together, so that the Centre could keep an eye on our progress.

So I started a Diary and took photos of activities we did. This proved to be vital for us to be able to look back just a few months and see what progress had been made. This was very encouraging.

Every few months we travelled back to the Centre in Cape Town and we were taught the next steps. These steps were very slight each time, but proved to be the success to out program.

A video recording was done during each return visit back to the Centre from Botswana every 3 months and we have all of these copies to share with you in our ‘Diary notes.

We took Hughan back to the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town in 2010, to meet everyone who had worked with him, as he was learning his lip reading skills and how to talk. This was fantastic for everyone to meet Hughan after so many years. It also gave Hughan the chance to meet the people who have played such a major part in him learning how to talk.

We also returned to the Centre again in 2011 to celebrate 25 years of the Cochlear Implant.

I look forward to your comments and hearing from you along the way.