Archive for Cape Town – Carel du Toit

Thursday 28/02/91 – 5th Lesson at Carel du Toit Centre

DIARY NOTES – In 1991, 23 years ago today this is what Vanessa wrote in the ‘Diary’.

23 years ago Vanessa wrote in Hughan’s diary during our 5th lesson at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town. I was being taught to work with Hughan. Vanessa watched me work with Hughan from an observation room, correcting me while I played with him.

Activity: Wrapped and hidden animals.

Aims:

1.       Repetition (verbal and non-verbal).

2.       Extension of his utterances.

3.       Manipulate turn taking.

Hughan said “pu” for “pull”/ “op” for “open”/ “off”/ “moo”.

Lovely with the animals sounds.

  • duck – quack, quack
  • dog – woof, woof
  • cat – meow, meow
  • cow – moo

Nice carrying out of the instructions:

  • “put the duck in the bin”
  • “jump into the bin”

With turn taking you got lovely repetition of duck and what it did. For example – “the duck says quack, quack”, “walk the duck – the duck is walking”.

Extend! Extend! Etend! Don’t be too hasty in moving on to something new. Extend and repeat one thing as much as possible before moving on.

Fantastic – he reacted immediately to me saying “moo” and “woof, woof” over the microphone.

Lovely Hughan shock the paper and couldn’t hear anything, so he shook his head and vocalised, so as to say “I can’t hear”.

Good: you physically reinforced “standing” – “the horse is standing” – “mummy is standing”.

Superb you remembered not to resort to “ta”. You said “give the horse” and if he doesn’t grasp it you utilise the natural gesture = out reached hands and repeat the language.

Much better! You are waiting for him to finish talking before you interpret.

Sue thank you so much. Your sessions are such a pleasure to observe. I always thoroughly enjoyed them. You and Hughan have an 11/10 relationship – you’re a super mum and your constant hard work, dedication, love, patience and positive attitude are truly reaping buckets of fruit. Hughan is making wonderful progress.

Vanessa

(These very kind comments that Vanessa wrote in the diary were always so encouraging and helped me to keep focused and positive while I was working with Hughan).

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you :) )

Wednesday 27/02/91 – Cape Town, 4th lesson

DIARY NOTES – In 1991, 23 years ago today this is what Vanessa wrote in the ‘Diary’.

23 years ago Vanessa, at the Carel du Toit Centre, wrote in Hughan’s diary during our 4th lesson in Cape Town. I was being taught how to work with Hughan.

Activity: Jelly

Aims: specific naming, repetition of actions and language, extension of repetitive language.

Hughan said “or” for “pour”- “Water, pour the water”, “pour the jelly”. His pronunciation improved with repetition.

Hughan also said “o” for “hot” – “the water is hot”.

Lovely at:

“Switching on the kettle” – Sue you used the word “tik”.

“Banging the spoon on the bottle” – You used the words “clang, clang”.

“More” – nicely extended, “more ice”, “more jelly”.

Utilise your turn taking, for example stirring and blowing. This forces non-verbal repetition and simultaneously creates opportunity for verbal repetition.

Remember to extend his one word utterances, for example – more jelly; pour the water. We always use a single word in a short sentence anyway.

Much better naming and repetition today, not to mention the words I heard for the first time, and so clearly to - wonderful.

Thank you

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you :) )

Tuesday 26/02/91 – A Visit to Dominican Grimley

DIARY NOTES – In 1991, 23 years ago today this is what I wrote in the ‘Diary’.

23 years ago today Willem and I had been advised to look at schooling in Cape Town, for our hearing impaired son, Hughan (Hughan was 2 ½ years old).

The Dominican Grimley this is a wonderful school for hearing impaired children in Cape Town.

Willem and I went with Hughan to visit the school. We were being encouraged to decide on what we were going to do to help Hughan in the future.

We were very impressed with the school and there were lots of extra facilities available for the children to help them with their growth and development with language and social skills.

The school also worked with a signing programme.

Hughan’s speech was not developing as quickly or as clearly as we had hoped, so the Carel du Toit Centre had recommended we visited the Dominican Grimley, as this may be an option for the future with Hughan’s schooling.

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you :) )

Monday 25/02/91 – 4th Video – 3rd lesson Cape Town

23 years ago today, Hughan and I were back in Cape Town, and Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre was doing a video recording of me working with Hughan.

Vanessa was correcting me during the session ( Hughan is 2  1/2 years old). These recordings were done during each return visit to the centre, every 3 months. We could then watch them at home in Gaborone, Botswana as a reminder of what we should be doing. I was being taught how to work with Hughan.

DIARY NOTES – In 1991, 23 years ago today this is what Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town wrote in the ‘Diary’.

23 years ago today, Hughan and I were back in Cape Town, and Vanessa was writing in our diary.

I was being taught how to work with Hughan –

Activity : blowing activities

Aim : specific naming, repetition of actions and language, extension of repetitive language.

Good Sue, your waiting for his eye contact before you give him the language.

Lovely pausing and expectation of verbal response for the word “blow”.

What I really love is the way you praise him. It is such motivation for him to try again.

“Ta” – when saying “ta” don’t use your hand straight away. First give him the command without the natural gesture and then if he doesn’t respond, come in with the natural gesture.

When he shakes the empty matchbox, instead of saying “there are no matches” rather interpret on an auditory level – in other words “I can’t hear”.

You said “hot” then Hughan said “ho” (hot) plus he put his hand over the flame and then quickly pulled it away.

You said “blow” (the candle)

Sue you get much wonderful eye contact and attention that you can really pause and expect nicely.

Command: “give mummy the match”. Lovely! When he didn’t respond you resorted to “ta”. Don’t change, keep the same vocabulary, ie. keep reinforcing “give” when he doesn’t understand you rather use the natural gesture (out stretched hand) then saying “ta”.

Hughan said “ie” as in (lie) – nicely interpreted Sue: “light the candle”.

He responded to “way the smoke” twice, this was lovely. Still difficult to determine whether he really understands or is he remembered the sequence we had been repeating with the candle.

Hughan said “ie” for “light”, note the same sound as before when he pointed to the candle and you interpreted light the candle, in other words “light” – fantastic!

Lovely modelling of number: “Mummy has 2 candles”.

Concept of big and small = lovely concept.

Command: “put the matches in the box”. No response and he went on to lighting the match. Once giving a command follow it through so that you reinforce the language.

“ba” (mind) when he want you to leave something alone.

Reacted to his name when I was knocking on the window – localised J

“bo – bo” of when popping the bubbles with his fingers – in other words “pop” which Sue had been modelling.

Sue this was a fantastic session I thoroughly enjoyed it and so did Hughan.

Willem welcome once again to Cape Town. Thanks for all the loving support you give Sue.

Enjoy the visit to the Dominicon Grimley (a school for hearing impaired children in Cape Town) tomorrow.

See you on Wednesday.

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you :) )

Friday 22/02/91 – 2nd Lesson With Vanessa

DIARY NOTES – In 1991, 23 years ago today this is what Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town wrote in the ‘Diary’.

23 years ago today, Hughan and I were back in Cape Town, and Vanessa was writing in our diary.

I was being taught how to work with Hughan –

Activity : coloured water play

Aims : extended his receptive language, animal sounds, concept of “same”.

“Babababa”(Hughan said) – “put the dark in the water” – Sue, lovely interpretation of his babbling.

“Woo woo” – sounds for the dog – lovely.

Sue said to Hughan – “show me the dog’s eye? This is wonderful.

Lovely Sue you reacted immediately to the knocking over the microphone. He repeated the sound : “Ba-bae-bae”

Sue remember to let him finish babbling before you come in with your interpretation.

Lovely you pointed out a variety of sounds :

  • water dripping through the hole
  • clanging the tins together

Sue you maintain his attention well and get lovely eye contact. Keep this up. You can repeat a lot more. Especially when doing an action eg. “dropping the fish”, “drop the fish” – a number of times.

Thanks Sue – hope Sunday is a special day for you.

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you :) )

Wednesday 20/02/91 – 1st Lesson Cape Town

DIARY NOTES – In 1991, 23 years ago today this is what Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town wrote in the ‘Diary’.

23 years ago today, Hughan and I were back in Cape Town, and Vanessa was writing in our diary.

I was being taught how to work with Hughan –

Hughan and I had flown to Cape Town from Gaborone, via Johannesburg. We were back at the Carel du Toit Centre where we were being taught how to encourage Hughan to use his voice to communicate with us.

This was a speech orientated programme which did not include signing.

Vanessa was very excited to see Hughan and I again. Hughan was very happy to be back at the centre.

During our classes I worked with Hughan and Vanessa observed us from another room, correcting me as I played with Hughan over a loudspeaker system.

Activity : car hunt

You gave lovely commands without clues.

“Put the truck in the box”, “look under the bed”, “look behind the curtain”, “pull the blanket” – you are also NOT gesturing. When he doesn’t understand what you have said you execute the command.

Lovely, you pointed out that the green Kombi and his shoes were the same colour. This is a super concept to reinforce.

Here’s auditory response generally is much better. He responded to –

  • his name
  • knocking on the door
  • knocking over the microphone (he thought it was the door)

When giving a command and he doesn’t understand, before you do the command prompt him

eg. “Look behind the curtain”, “where is the curtain?”, “there is the curtain” – then repeat the command – “ look behind the curtain” and if he is still does not respond then you do the command.

Super, you pointed out a big car and a small car. A big wheel and a small wheel.

This would make a lovely theme for the book: big and small pictures.

I love the way he hid the cars – showed and said “gone” and then finds it again with much glee.

Well done Sue! You’re using sound to get his attention and you’re not touching him.

Hunts - are a lovely opportunity to extend and reinforce receptive language. Play these games at home in the bedroom, lounge etc. You can hide anything – animals, sweets, toys etc.

Try and hide the same things eg: rabbits, blocks, dogs, books etc, so it is one concept and you can compare the items – like you compared the cars today – big, small, sounds, wheels etc.

Thanks Sue, this was super. He is responding lots, especially his auditory awareness. His attention is a lot better.

Welcome back, it is WONDERFUL to see you again. Birthday and all this is really going to be a special visit.

Enjoy the afternoon

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you :) )

Thursday 06/12/90 – Making Little Books

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DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today Hughan and I were at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town…This was our last session with Vanessa and this is what she wrote in our ‘Diary’….

 

Dear Sue

The end of yet another great visit. Once again it has been a pleasure working with you. Hughan is making lovely progress. Keep at the constant hard work and your positive attitude.

Please work constantly on the following at home:

1)      Intensive auditory training

  • this must please be done daily
  • work with loud sounds (banging, knocking etc) until he responds consistently. Then concentrate on softer sounds.
  • Incorporate your animal and transport sounds
  • Remember: sound versus no sound. Pointed to your ear and say “ I can hear” or shake your head, look sad and say “I can’t hear”(no sound).

2)      Expect language – (one word utterances from Hughan) see my note dated 23-08-90

3)      Extended his receptive language

a)      get his eye contact

b)      give the command (no action)

c)       allow him to respond

d)      if he doesn’t understand, YOU do the command and repeat the language. Try giving options e.g. hold a cup and glass in your hands and say “ta the cup”. See if he responds correctly. This is a lovely simple way of testing what words (vocabulary) he understands.

4)      NAME everything: this is important as it builds up his vocabulary – firstly receptive and then consequently expressive.

The books you are going to make will help reinforce vocabulary. Remember:

MAKING BOOKS

  • one book for one theme
  • stick one picture on a page
  • you can write the word underneath.

Here are some themes to start with –

a)      Body book – face, eyes, nose, mouth, teeth, ears, hair, neck, arms, leg, feet, hands etc.

b)      Animal book - cat, dog, bird, cow, horse, sheep, chicken, duck etc – lovely for auditory training.

c)       Clothes – shoes, socks, hat, shirt, shorts, vest, jumper etc.

d)      Food -  banana, bread, biscuits, eggs, milk, juice, cake etc – all the things he eats.

Then you can take each room in the house:

e)      Rooms in the House –  Bathroom – Bath, tap, towel, soap. Kitchen -  stove, fridge, table, chair, plate, Knife, fork, spoon etc. Bedroom – bed, blanket, pillow, cupboard, teddy etc.

Another lovely idea is an Action book e.g. run, jump, sleep, eat, kick the ball, read, swim etc.

More tips :

  • try find the biggest picture
  • look for a picture that is coloured rather than black and white
  • keep the books in a particular place so Hughan can become familiar with them so that he can have access to these books whenever he wants to read them
  • always use full sentences
  • don’t just name the picture e.g. “this is a dog” – discuss the picture i.e.” the dog is dirty”, “he has mud on his paws”, “where’s Hughan’s paws?” “ Hughan has got feet” etc.

5)      When trying to get Hughan’s attention:

a)      first call him

b)      then try clapping, clicking your fingers.

c)       Then try banging on something.

d)      And finally wiggle your fingers.

DO NOT TOUCH HUGHAN! (when trying to get his attention).

6)      Hughan is babbling more and more. Remember to interpret his babbling – re: give him the language for what he is trying to say.

7)      Complete your columns at the back of the book (keeping note of what Hughan was saying)

  • Understand – words and commands he responds to without visual clues
  • Imitate – what he verbally copies
  • Spontaneous – what he says on his own.

8)      Don’t rush: extend, extend, extend! as much as possible. Move on when Hughan want to, in other words following his interest e.g. he felt the orange many times, repeating it felt cold etc and when Hughan was tired of that, then we only moved on to cutting, squeezing etc.

9)      Apply the occupational therapists guidelines.

10)   Please keep in touch. We are already in book 2. Always keep book 1 handy. Try reading through all the notes as often as possible. Read a bit every week. This is good for refreshing your memory and more brushing up techniques. I’m looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Thanks for all your Corporation and dedication this year. It has been an exciting year and Hughan has made lovely progress. An exciting continuation of your journey lies await for us next year. But still I see you again, take care and have a wonderful Christmas and New Year.

Have a safe journey home. It is for Vil and Hughan and my regards to Willem.

Thanks again and see you all soon (Feb).

Vanessa J

This is a picture of Hughan playing with a friend in Cape Town…

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)

Tuesday 04/12/90 – 3rd Video Carel du Toit Centre

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today Hughan and I were attending our fifth lesson with Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town…

 

Activity: instant pudding

Aims:

1)      auditory training

2)      expect one word utterances

3)      receptive language

Good naming: as you held the object right next to your face:

“Spoon”: “this is a spoon”

“bowl”: “this is a bowl”

“sieve”: “hold the sieve”

Good you emphasised “pour” on its own, waiting and expecting a response and then put “pour” into a short sentence. “Pour the milk”. I want to see this a lot more.

WONDERFUL!!! He did respond to them knocking. He looked at the camera (wrong direction that for now that is okay) and kept dead still. My first definite observation of a reaction to sound this visit J

Sue don’t rush! Take your time. Forget about completing the activity, rather concentrate on how you can extend each step e.g. you could have banged a lot longer with the spoon and made much more of the pouring of the milk.

With your commands remember

1)      get his eye contact

2)      give the command (no gestures)

3)      allow him to respond

4)      if he doesn’t understand you, do the command, and repeat the language.

Don’t be too hasty when moving from step 2 to step 3.

e.g. “pour the powder in the milk” – you were already doing the action and helping him to do it before you had completed the command. Ideally try hold the object next to your face ( pudding packet) – say the whole sentence “pour” “pour the powder in the milk” and when finished then only do the action and repeat the language.

Great: you are always waiting for his eye contact before you give him the language. Keep this up.

Hughan said – “G”: give him the language for what he wants to say e.g. “give me the beater please”. Good you do this nicely when he said “Aa” and pointed at you “mummy’s turn”.

Hughan said – “On”(gone) plus arms stretched out; “gone” (the mixture is finished) lovely J.

Note for my command “ta the cloth” (give me the cloth) I had a class in one hand and paper in the other. A wonderful way to check if he understood “cloth”. He took the correct one J. I would try this is a few times to check if he really understands the word. Try similar techniques at home.

On the video we also tried this with the parts of the face: “ta the eye” and you held the eye and the nose in your hand.

Thank you Sue this was a lovely video session, and we got a few of his one word utterances which illustrates the progress (expressive language) he’s made.

Enjoy the beach.

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)

Monday 03/12/12 – 4th lesson with Vanessa

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today Hughan and I were attending our forth lesson with Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town…

This is what Vanessa wrote in the Diary -

Activity : bag of surprises

Aims :

1)      auditory training

2)      expect language

“Ya-ya-ya-ya”

He immediately banged with the spoon on table. Lovely Sue you pointed to your ear and imitated the sound with your voice: “bang bang bang”.

Hughan was saying “hum, hum, hum” when playing with the car.

He uses “up” for a variety of words e.g. “open” (open the tin), “give” (give me the bag).

When pointing out the no-sound remember to look very sad : “I can’t hear” this is a visual contrast to your happy face you use when you can hear a sound.

“More” (give me more parcels).

Such a simple game has a lovely repetitive pattern. So each time we reinforce simple commands.

e.g. “open the bag”, “take out a present”, “open the present”, “shake the tin (name the item)” ,

“I can hear, “I can’t hear”.

Please try this at home daily :

lovely Sue: today you were much more tuned into sound and listening and you made Hughan aware of this. Don’t rush your auditory training and making him aware of sound. Remember you can never over repeat. Repeat as much as possible.

You pointed out the parts of the face on the toy a man and then on Hughan’s face – lovely.

To help Hughan become more aware of sound, try to utilise his sense of touch e.g. if he can feel vibrations – when he shakes a turn with something in and then shakes the tin again when there is nothing in; he can tactilely feel the difference. This is also linked up with our facial expressions.

Hughan loved this game. We maintained his attention throughout the session and he was all so curious to see what was the next surprise coming out of the bag.

Thank you. Please do some auditory training this afternoon.

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)

Saturday 1/12/90 – Language Comprehension Test

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today Hughan and I were at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town…

Vanessa had given us some homework to do over the weekend.

Language comprehension test for parents (receptive language).

Age 12 – 18 Months

1)      When a child is doing something he likes doing, but which he should not do (such as touching the plants or the TV) stand a little distance away (without stopping the action or touching the child) and say –

“don’t” or

“no, no” or

any customary warning such as “stop it” or “Oh-no”.

See whether the child interrupts his action by stopping – 10 to one he will do it again – but if he stops for a little while, he shows that he understands.

Hughan – when saying “no” Hughan stops straight away and will not carry on with what he was doing. He understands the word “no”.

2)      To see whether a child can understand “bye-bye”, do the following:-

Pretend to walk away and wave, saying “bye-bye”. If he waves back, he understands the word. At 16 to 18 months he should be able to understand “bye-bye” without the waving gesture. When one of the parents prepares to go away, leaving the child with strangers, he should have a sad expression on hearing “bye-bye”. This is also a sign that he understands.

Hughan - understands when you say “bye-bye” and depending on the circumstance, sometimes he waves. He always waves goodbye to Daddy and Vil, but not always to people he doesn’t know very well.

3)      After being taught the game “clap your hands” (or clap handies), “shut your eyes”, he should be able to do it when requested.

Hughan - he does not clap his hands on request.

4)      “Sit” may be tested by telling baby to sit and indicating with your hand that he must sit. Later he should understand it without the gesture. Remember to get his attention, then to say “sit”, since he must be able to do it after hearing it once or twice – no more.

Hughan – responds to being told “sit”, “sit down”. He will also do this without a gesture.

5)      To see whether he understands “hot”, take him to something that maybe hot, that as a stove, heater or kettle. When he reaches for it, say, “it’s hot”. Don’t say “no, don’t touch”, or “Ugh”, because in that way he doesn’t test the word “hot”. It may be necessary first to learn the word “hot” and then test it. If he understands the word “hot” he will pull away before touching the object. If he pulls away after touching it, it may mean that he has felt the heat and still does not know the meaning of the word “hot”. He should also completely stop touching it, and never touch it again.

Hughan - he can say the word “hot” and he is aware of the items that are hot – stove, kettle and teapot. He puts his hand forward and pulled it away before touching the item and says “hot”.

6) When a child is with other people, call his name. If he looks round, it may be that he understands. To be 100% sure, leave the room and when you re-enter, call somebody else’s name. He should not look round. It is difficult to be sure whether a child knows his name; therefore it may be point to the test over a period of time.

Hughan – he often turns around promptly to being called, but I would not say at this stage he knows his name. He also turns around to “no” and “come” as well.

18 – 24 Months

1)      Place 4 objects before the child – any of the following: shoe, cup, bottle, hand, cat, milk, ball, car, baby doll, spoon, chair, – in other words any well-known objects from his surroundings. Rather do not use pictures.

Give the instructions:

a)      “show me the ball”

b)      “give me the ball”

c)       “pick up the ball”

Thus two things are tested:

a)      whether he knows the words, and

b)      whether he can follow the instructions.

If you say “give me the shoe” and the child points at the shoe, then he understands “shoe” but not “give”.

Hughan - I placed one of his shoes (that he was not wearing), a ball, a car and a In front of him. When I asked him for the shoe, he went to take his shoe or his foot. He gave me the ball and the car when being asked. He does not understand the instructions. He did not give me the cup when being asked.

2)      Ask the child “where are/is your eyes, nose, ears, hair, foot and also give instructions, such as, “put out your tongue; close your eyes”. He should know the names of three parts of the body.

Hughan - tries saying the word “eye” and has said “ear” once and also nose, hair and foot. After bath time I asked him the different names and he points to is eyes only when being asked. I have played games with Hughan in the past with – “close your eyes”, “open your eyes” and it has been a game. He did not do this when I asked him to, only when I had started the game.

24 – 30 Months

1)      take a cardboard box and a block or any well-known object and ask the child’s to put it in the box, and then on, or under the box. You are testing whether he understands in/on/under. Do not make use of gestures – don’t point. If he can’t do it, test him again on another day. He should know all these prepositions.

2)      To test whether he understands the question, “where” and the name of at least 12 objects as well as 6 to 7 parts of the body: use any words known to him, such as shoe, ball, brush, spoon, plate, and parts of the body such as eyes, nose, mouth, neck etc. and asked the child, “where is the spoon?”or ”where are your shoes?” Also “where is your nose?” etc. sometimes children prefer using a doll rather than pointing to themselves.

3)      The child should know three dinner- ware articles, such as spoon, fork, Knife, etc. Ask him, “where is the knife?” or “give daddy the knife”. This test is only to see whether he knows the name of the article and not whether he understands the instruction or question.

4)      Using the same cutlery as in no. 3 – knife, spoon, fork, etc., test whether the child understands “not”. Ask, “which is not the fork?” The child should be able to understand “not”. Ask three times. He should answer correctly all three times.

5)      To test “your” and “my”: take any article he knows, e.g. a hat, and tell him “put the hat on your head”. “Now put the hat on my head”. “Now put the hat on your head again”. He should respond correctly to all three test questions.

Thanks Sue, you can continue to work on the aspects at home.

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)