Archive for December 2013

Thursday 13/12/90 – Making Christmas Mince Pies

91

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today this is what I wrote in the ‘Diary’.

Today our friends came to see us. I decided we were going to make Christmas mince pies.

The children enjoyed themselves. Pouring, mixing, Kneading and doing everything for themselves.

90

They were all very proud of their pies. We had turn taking and I felt Hughan was looking for language and keeping up with the others very well.

We also visited friends in the afternoon (our usual Thursday afternoon group).

Hughan is not sleeping well at night and refuses to sleep at lunchtime. He was not much fun this afternoon as he was very tired.

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you :) )

Wednesday 12/12/90 – A Hearing Impaired Friend

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today this is what I wrote in the ‘Diary’.

Hughan is much better today.

We went to visit friends in the afternoon who also have a hearing impaired son.

The boys get on really well and had a super time together.

Vil played well with the sister.

When we got home we put the Christmas decorations up in the house.

Hughan loves the tree lights.

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you :) )

Tuesday 11/12/90 – Hughan is Not Well

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today this is what I wrote in the ‘Diary’.

Hughan woke up today with a very high temperature.

So it was Hughan’s turn to see the doctor. He has a 24 hour virus and because he is on antibiotics I must just make sure his temperature does not get too high.

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)

Monday 10/12/90 – Back Home in Gaborone

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today this is what I wrote in the ‘Diary’.

We had returned from a trip to Cape Town, where we attended the Carel du Toit Centre. We were being taught how to encourage our son to speak and to teach him his lip reading skills.

Vanessa worked very closely with us at the Centre and we kept this diary as we lived far away and it enabled us to look back at what we had been taught on each trip, to remind us and also Vanessa could keep track of what we were doing at home.

Dear Vanessa

Hughan and I were back in Gaborone just before two o’clock in the afternoon. It was a nice feeling to be home again with Willem and Vil.

We had a great time in Cape Town as usual. It’s such a nice feeling to get advice and I always feel very inspired when I get home. You are always such a great help. Thanks!

Vil was very pleased to have us home, and he had been very good well we have been away.

Hughan’s cold has really set in. I am very pleased the doctor started him on antibiotics before I left Cape Town.

On Sunday I had Hughan’s cold. Willem was a great help with the boys, which meant I could rest.

I took Vil to the doctor as he is always on about stomach ache. Not sure if it is attention seeking. The doctor could not find anything wrong with Vil, so he is to have a whole lot of tests done.

We visited friends in the afternoon.

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)

Thursday 06/12/90 – Making Little Books

85

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today Hughan and I were at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town…This was our last session with Vanessa and this is what she wrote in our ‘Diary’….

 

Dear Sue

The end of yet another great visit. Once again it has been a pleasure working with you. Hughan is making lovely progress. Keep at the constant hard work and your positive attitude.

Please work constantly on the following at home:

1)      Intensive auditory training

  • this must please be done daily
  • work with loud sounds (banging, knocking etc) until he responds consistently. Then concentrate on softer sounds.
  • Incorporate your animal and transport sounds
  • Remember: sound versus no sound. Pointed to your ear and say “ I can hear” or shake your head, look sad and say “I can’t hear”(no sound).

2)      Expect language – (one word utterances from Hughan) see my note dated 23-08-90

3)      Extended his receptive language

a)      get his eye contact

b)      give the command (no action)

c)       allow him to respond

d)      if he doesn’t understand, YOU do the command and repeat the language. Try giving options e.g. hold a cup and glass in your hands and say “ta the cup”. See if he responds correctly. This is a lovely simple way of testing what words (vocabulary) he understands.

4)      NAME everything: this is important as it builds up his vocabulary – firstly receptive and then consequently expressive.

The books you are going to make will help reinforce vocabulary. Remember:

MAKING BOOKS

  • one book for one theme
  • stick one picture on a page
  • you can write the word underneath.

Here are some themes to start with –

a)      Body book – face, eyes, nose, mouth, teeth, ears, hair, neck, arms, leg, feet, hands etc.

b)      Animal book - cat, dog, bird, cow, horse, sheep, chicken, duck etc – lovely for auditory training.

c)       Clothes – shoes, socks, hat, shirt, shorts, vest, jumper etc.

d)      Food -  banana, bread, biscuits, eggs, milk, juice, cake etc – all the things he eats.

Then you can take each room in the house:

e)      Rooms in the House –  Bathroom – Bath, tap, towel, soap. Kitchen -  stove, fridge, table, chair, plate, Knife, fork, spoon etc. Bedroom – bed, blanket, pillow, cupboard, teddy etc.

Another lovely idea is an Action book e.g. run, jump, sleep, eat, kick the ball, read, swim etc.

More tips :

  • try find the biggest picture
  • look for a picture that is coloured rather than black and white
  • keep the books in a particular place so Hughan can become familiar with them so that he can have access to these books whenever he wants to read them
  • always use full sentences
  • don’t just name the picture e.g. “this is a dog” – discuss the picture i.e.” the dog is dirty”, “he has mud on his paws”, “where’s Hughan’s paws?” “ Hughan has got feet” etc.

5)      When trying to get Hughan’s attention:

a)      first call him

b)      then try clapping, clicking your fingers.

c)       Then try banging on something.

d)      And finally wiggle your fingers.

DO NOT TOUCH HUGHAN! (when trying to get his attention).

6)      Hughan is babbling more and more. Remember to interpret his babbling – re: give him the language for what he is trying to say.

7)      Complete your columns at the back of the book (keeping note of what Hughan was saying)

  • Understand – words and commands he responds to without visual clues
  • Imitate – what he verbally copies
  • Spontaneous – what he says on his own.

8)      Don’t rush: extend, extend, extend! as much as possible. Move on when Hughan want to, in other words following his interest e.g. he felt the orange many times, repeating it felt cold etc and when Hughan was tired of that, then we only moved on to cutting, squeezing etc.

9)      Apply the occupational therapists guidelines.

10)   Please keep in touch. We are already in book 2. Always keep book 1 handy. Try reading through all the notes as often as possible. Read a bit every week. This is good for refreshing your memory and more brushing up techniques. I’m looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Thanks for all your Corporation and dedication this year. It has been an exciting year and Hughan has made lovely progress. An exciting continuation of your journey lies await for us next year. But still I see you again, take care and have a wonderful Christmas and New Year.

Have a safe journey home. It is for Vil and Hughan and my regards to Willem.

Thanks again and see you all soon (Feb).

Vanessa J

This is a picture of Hughan playing with a friend in Cape Town…

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)

Tuesday 04/12/90 – 3rd Video Carel du Toit Centre

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today Hughan and I were attending our fifth lesson with Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town…

 

Activity: instant pudding

Aims:

1)      auditory training

2)      expect one word utterances

3)      receptive language

Good naming: as you held the object right next to your face:

“Spoon”: “this is a spoon”

“bowl”: “this is a bowl”

“sieve”: “hold the sieve”

Good you emphasised “pour” on its own, waiting and expecting a response and then put “pour” into a short sentence. “Pour the milk”. I want to see this a lot more.

WONDERFUL!!! He did respond to them knocking. He looked at the camera (wrong direction that for now that is okay) and kept dead still. My first definite observation of a reaction to sound this visit J

Sue don’t rush! Take your time. Forget about completing the activity, rather concentrate on how you can extend each step e.g. you could have banged a lot longer with the spoon and made much more of the pouring of the milk.

With your commands remember

1)      get his eye contact

2)      give the command (no gestures)

3)      allow him to respond

4)      if he doesn’t understand you, do the command, and repeat the language.

Don’t be too hasty when moving from step 2 to step 3.

e.g. “pour the powder in the milk” – you were already doing the action and helping him to do it before you had completed the command. Ideally try hold the object next to your face ( pudding packet) – say the whole sentence “pour” “pour the powder in the milk” and when finished then only do the action and repeat the language.

Great: you are always waiting for his eye contact before you give him the language. Keep this up.

Hughan said – “G”: give him the language for what he wants to say e.g. “give me the beater please”. Good you do this nicely when he said “Aa” and pointed at you “mummy’s turn”.

Hughan said – “On”(gone) plus arms stretched out; “gone” (the mixture is finished) lovely J.

Note for my command “ta the cloth” (give me the cloth) I had a class in one hand and paper in the other. A wonderful way to check if he understood “cloth”. He took the correct one J. I would try this is a few times to check if he really understands the word. Try similar techniques at home.

On the video we also tried this with the parts of the face: “ta the eye” and you held the eye and the nose in your hand.

Thank you Sue this was a lovely video session, and we got a few of his one word utterances which illustrates the progress (expressive language) he’s made.

Enjoy the beach.

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)

Monday 03/12/12 – 4th lesson with Vanessa

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today Hughan and I were attending our forth lesson with Vanessa at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town…

This is what Vanessa wrote in the Diary -

Activity : bag of surprises

Aims :

1)      auditory training

2)      expect language

“Ya-ya-ya-ya”

He immediately banged with the spoon on table. Lovely Sue you pointed to your ear and imitated the sound with your voice: “bang bang bang”.

Hughan was saying “hum, hum, hum” when playing with the car.

He uses “up” for a variety of words e.g. “open” (open the tin), “give” (give me the bag).

When pointing out the no-sound remember to look very sad : “I can’t hear” this is a visual contrast to your happy face you use when you can hear a sound.

“More” (give me more parcels).

Such a simple game has a lovely repetitive pattern. So each time we reinforce simple commands.

e.g. “open the bag”, “take out a present”, “open the present”, “shake the tin (name the item)” ,

“I can hear, “I can’t hear”.

Please try this at home daily :

lovely Sue: today you were much more tuned into sound and listening and you made Hughan aware of this. Don’t rush your auditory training and making him aware of sound. Remember you can never over repeat. Repeat as much as possible.

You pointed out the parts of the face on the toy a man and then on Hughan’s face – lovely.

To help Hughan become more aware of sound, try to utilise his sense of touch e.g. if he can feel vibrations – when he shakes a turn with something in and then shakes the tin again when there is nothing in; he can tactilely feel the difference. This is also linked up with our facial expressions.

Hughan loved this game. We maintained his attention throughout the session and he was all so curious to see what was the next surprise coming out of the bag.

Thank you. Please do some auditory training this afternoon.

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)

Saturday 1/12/90 – Language Comprehension Test

DIARY NOTES – In 1990, 23 years ago today Hughan and I were at the Carel du Toit Centre in Cape Town…

Vanessa had given us some homework to do over the weekend.

Language comprehension test for parents (receptive language).

Age 12 – 18 Months

1)      When a child is doing something he likes doing, but which he should not do (such as touching the plants or the TV) stand a little distance away (without stopping the action or touching the child) and say –

“don’t” or

“no, no” or

any customary warning such as “stop it” or “Oh-no”.

See whether the child interrupts his action by stopping – 10 to one he will do it again – but if he stops for a little while, he shows that he understands.

Hughan – when saying “no” Hughan stops straight away and will not carry on with what he was doing. He understands the word “no”.

2)      To see whether a child can understand “bye-bye”, do the following:-

Pretend to walk away and wave, saying “bye-bye”. If he waves back, he understands the word. At 16 to 18 months he should be able to understand “bye-bye” without the waving gesture. When one of the parents prepares to go away, leaving the child with strangers, he should have a sad expression on hearing “bye-bye”. This is also a sign that he understands.

Hughan - understands when you say “bye-bye” and depending on the circumstance, sometimes he waves. He always waves goodbye to Daddy and Vil, but not always to people he doesn’t know very well.

3)      After being taught the game “clap your hands” (or clap handies), “shut your eyes”, he should be able to do it when requested.

Hughan - he does not clap his hands on request.

4)      “Sit” may be tested by telling baby to sit and indicating with your hand that he must sit. Later he should understand it without the gesture. Remember to get his attention, then to say “sit”, since he must be able to do it after hearing it once or twice – no more.

Hughan – responds to being told “sit”, “sit down”. He will also do this without a gesture.

5)      To see whether he understands “hot”, take him to something that maybe hot, that as a stove, heater or kettle. When he reaches for it, say, “it’s hot”. Don’t say “no, don’t touch”, or “Ugh”, because in that way he doesn’t test the word “hot”. It may be necessary first to learn the word “hot” and then test it. If he understands the word “hot” he will pull away before touching the object. If he pulls away after touching it, it may mean that he has felt the heat and still does not know the meaning of the word “hot”. He should also completely stop touching it, and never touch it again.

Hughan - he can say the word “hot” and he is aware of the items that are hot – stove, kettle and teapot. He puts his hand forward and pulled it away before touching the item and says “hot”.

6) When a child is with other people, call his name. If he looks round, it may be that he understands. To be 100% sure, leave the room and when you re-enter, call somebody else’s name. He should not look round. It is difficult to be sure whether a child knows his name; therefore it may be point to the test over a period of time.

Hughan – he often turns around promptly to being called, but I would not say at this stage he knows his name. He also turns around to “no” and “come” as well.

18 – 24 Months

1)      Place 4 objects before the child – any of the following: shoe, cup, bottle, hand, cat, milk, ball, car, baby doll, spoon, chair, – in other words any well-known objects from his surroundings. Rather do not use pictures.

Give the instructions:

a)      “show me the ball”

b)      “give me the ball”

c)       “pick up the ball”

Thus two things are tested:

a)      whether he knows the words, and

b)      whether he can follow the instructions.

If you say “give me the shoe” and the child points at the shoe, then he understands “shoe” but not “give”.

Hughan - I placed one of his shoes (that he was not wearing), a ball, a car and a In front of him. When I asked him for the shoe, he went to take his shoe or his foot. He gave me the ball and the car when being asked. He does not understand the instructions. He did not give me the cup when being asked.

2)      Ask the child “where are/is your eyes, nose, ears, hair, foot and also give instructions, such as, “put out your tongue; close your eyes”. He should know the names of three parts of the body.

Hughan - tries saying the word “eye” and has said “ear” once and also nose, hair and foot. After bath time I asked him the different names and he points to is eyes only when being asked. I have played games with Hughan in the past with – “close your eyes”, “open your eyes” and it has been a game. He did not do this when I asked him to, only when I had started the game.

24 – 30 Months

1)      take a cardboard box and a block or any well-known object and ask the child’s to put it in the box, and then on, or under the box. You are testing whether he understands in/on/under. Do not make use of gestures – don’t point. If he can’t do it, test him again on another day. He should know all these prepositions.

2)      To test whether he understands the question, “where” and the name of at least 12 objects as well as 6 to 7 parts of the body: use any words known to him, such as shoe, ball, brush, spoon, plate, and parts of the body such as eyes, nose, mouth, neck etc. and asked the child, “where is the spoon?”or ”where are your shoes?” Also “where is your nose?” etc. sometimes children prefer using a doll rather than pointing to themselves.

3)      The child should know three dinner- ware articles, such as spoon, fork, Knife, etc. Ask him, “where is the knife?” or “give daddy the knife”. This test is only to see whether he knows the name of the article and not whether he understands the instruction or question.

4)      Using the same cutlery as in no. 3 – knife, spoon, fork, etc., test whether the child understands “not”. Ask, “which is not the fork?” The child should be able to understand “not”. Ask three times. He should answer correctly all three times.

5)      To test “your” and “my”: take any article he knows, e.g. a hat, and tell him “put the hat on your head”. “Now put the hat on my head”. “Now put the hat on your head again”. He should respond correctly to all three test questions.

Thanks Sue, you can continue to work on the aspects at home.

Vanessa

(Helping parents with hearing impaired children through our experience…we are following our profoundly deaf son’s diary, from 1990, so you can see what we did to help him with his speech and hearing. Hughan is 25 years old now and he can hold a conversation on a phone. It is the little thing we did every day, over a long period of time, that has helped him. Please visit our page…’like’ and follow us to help others…Thank you)